I am an illustrator, comic artist, and serigrapher. I enjoy drawing comics, painting in acrylic and watercolor, and I screen print tshirts and other things.
I am available for commissions, and I can do custom order screen printing jobs if you need some awesomely designed tees.

 

nellucnhoj:

Sometimes I wonder what the heck Spider-man’s webbing attaches to.
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This is too awesome.

nellucnhoj:

Sometimes I wonder what the heck Spider-man’s webbing attaches to.

Tumblr TwitterFacebookBuy my book

This is too awesome.

Four down, two left for the next series. Check my feed to see what else I have! I never appreciated Gill Man aka The Creature as a child, mainly because he was so rubbery and stiff. The best interpretation of Gill Man was in 1987’s Monster Squad.What’s next? Frankenstein for sure. But Phantom of the Opera or Imhotep the Mummy? After this run of six,  I may have to do the more obscure or later era “atomic age” monsters like The Amazing Colossal Man, the 50 Foot Woman, and The Metaluna Mutant (This Island Earth). After that, I may finally jump the pond and do Hammer Horror.The final art will be printed six cards on 12x12 chipboard via silkscreen printmaking. Then I’ll cut the cards to separate them. Previous runs I’ve done them individually and damn thats a nauseating pain in the butt. This will be much faster knocking out six cards at a time.

Four down, two left for the next series. Check my feed to see what else I have! I never appreciated Gill Man aka The Creature as a child, mainly because he was so rubbery and stiff. The best interpretation of Gill Man was in 1987’s Monster Squad.

What’s next? Frankenstein for sure. But Phantom of the Opera or Imhotep the Mummy? After this run of six,  I may have to do the more obscure or later era “atomic age” monsters like The Amazing Colossal Man, the 50 Foot Woman, and The Metaluna Mutant (This Island Earth). After that, I may finally jump the pond and do Hammer Horror.

The final art will be printed six cards on 12x12 chipboard via silkscreen printmaking. Then I’ll cut the cards to separate them. Previous runs I’ve done them individually and damn thats a nauseating pain in the butt. This will be much faster knocking out six cards at a time.

(Source: facebook.com)

For those that can’t afford the real deal #ouija boards I’ve been making on wood, how about a silkscreen ouija postcard?

For those that can’t afford the real deal #ouija boards I’ve been making on wood, how about a silkscreen ouija postcard?

Second piece of Penny Dreadful fanart, this time with Josh Hartnett as Ethan Chandler, the American Werewolf.

Second piece of Penny Dreadful fanart, this time with Josh Hartnett as Ethan Chandler, the American Werewolf.

(Source: facebook.com)

Had to draw Eva Green from Penny Dreadful. What an awesome tv series.

Had to draw Eva Green from Penny Dreadful. What an awesome tv series.

(Source: facebook.com)

Took some more photos of the board and planchette alone on white paper. Now people can see closeups of the finished product with each piece separately.
The board is 14”x20”x1”. The planchette is 7” in diameter. They are both solid wood, stained by hand, sanded, and I silkscreen printed the art I designed onto each, then gave both a glossy finish. Each board takes several days to make to allow drying between each stage. I make these in my garage during my free time. It’s a passion to make something that looks elegant, and can even be hung on the wall as art.

These boards are available both on Etsy and Ebay for your convenience. They are $50 for the board and planchette together, and $20 to ship across the US. If you are a serious buyer and live elsewhere, I can take the package to the post office and get a price for you, and we can use Paypal for a transaction.

(Source: jesseacosta.net)

Quick House Layout/Plans for Comic Artists

Eplans.com is a website that sells blueprints for houses. 

This might not seem that helpful but if you want a characters house you can make selections based on what sort of house you want them to live in. 

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Then browse through the results and find the house you want. Then you can view the blueprints and have a room layout for that house, which can help with visualising the space they live in. 

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(Source: eplans.com)

The 16 Different Types of (Art School) Students

I saw this on my old acrylic painting professor’s Facebook page, and loved it so much I had to share it! I was somewhere between the Metal Student and the Average/Good Student, with touches of anime, stressed, hippy, and goth/emo. If you can’t laugh at this, you’re probably still in school, or still insecure with who you are.

PS I still miss my long hair. :S

The 16 Different Types of (Art School) Students

Chuck Dillon has been teaching for 10 years now at the Hussian School of Art in Philadelphia. After seeing students come and go, he decided to create sixteen different stereotypes he sees day in and day out. Though I’ve personally never gone to art school, I can appreciate these for what they’re worth - a hilarious depiction of what students look like in this day and age

(Source: jesseacosta.blogspot.com)

Meet the Hero Designer Who Publicly Shamed Showtime for Asking Him to Work for Free How Dan Cassaro’s tweet became a rallying cry
By David Griner
 When Showtime invited Dan Cassaro to join a design “contest” he felt amounted to milking professionals for free work, he let the network—and the world—know how he felt about it.
The offer, made to a number of designers, involved promoting the Floyd Mayweather-Marcos Maidana boxing match on Sept. 13. Those who submitted designs for Showtime’s use “could be eligible for a chance to win a trip to Las Vegas and have your artwork displayed in the MGM Grand during fight week!,” the network told Cassaro in an email.
After sending an email response slathered in sarcasm (“I know that boxing matches in Las Vegas are extremely low-budget affairs”), Cassaro then posted the exchange to Twitter.

In the week since, Cassaro’s tweet has become a viral rallying cry for creatives who feel besieged by expectations of free work. It has more than 5,000 retweets and 5,600 favorites, and has become one of the topic’s most electrifying moments since Mike Monteiro’s “Fuck You Pay Me” speech in 2011.
Showtime issued a response to BuzzFeed, saying the network is “a strong supporter of artists around the world. This contest, like many others, is entirely optional.”
We caught up with Cassaro to ask what it’s been like seeing his frustration go global.
AdFreak: Your tweet just keeps blowing up. A week later, it’s still being retweeted. What’s it been like watching it all unfold?
Dan Cassaro: It’s been pretty unreal. I would have double-checked my grammar if I knew this many people would see it.
Why did you go public with it? Clearly, you were frustrated. But after responding to Showtime, what made you say, “Screw it, I’m going to post this on Twitter”?
Partially I just wanted to do it as a joke. But I also wanted to let people know that while it’s good to say no to this kind of work, it’s even better to explain to everyone why this business model is unacceptable.
Why do you think it struck such a chord with designers and other creatives?
Because they all get these emails. And it’s not just designers. I received a ton of responses from writers, cartoonists, architects and people in other professions who get asked to work for free. I don’t know what it is. Maybe people think that if you went to art school you don’t understand money?
Were you concerned about calling out a brand like Showtime by posting the email? I’m guessing they won’t become a paying client anytime soon.
Who knows? Maybe they admire my pluck? Honestly, people valuing themselves and their work enough to say no to this kind of thing has more long-term value than any one job or one client.
Has Showtime responded directly to you?
They wrote me a short and very polite email. Honestly, it’s less about Showtime and more about these hack crowdsourcing campaigns that certain agencies are selling to them. There are lots of folks doing very cool things with user-generated content, but to ask professionals to compete against each other for potential “exposure” is completely different. It’s demeaning, and it lowers the value of everyone’s work.
Among your peers, clearly a vast majority of the response has been positive. Have any designers criticized you for how you handled it?
The response from designers has pretty much been all positive. Some guy on a boxing enthusiast forum called me a “slimy hipster,” though.
Do you think anything constructive will come out of this, for yourself or the industry?
I hope so. If nothing else, it’s good to get people talking about it.

Three down, three left for the next series. Check my feed to see what else I have! Always loved Invisible Man, most people forget him. Maybe because he’s invisible. This art isn’t quite done, thinking of doing maybe an old castle stone window in the background. I really want to work this series. The last four I did were awfully plain.What’s next? Frankenstein for sure. The Creature from the Black Lagoon, aka Gillman, Imhotep the Mummy, maybe Phantom of the Opera. From there I may have to do the more obscure or later era monsters like The Amazing Colossal Man, the 50 Foot Woman, and The Metaluna Mutant (This Island Earth). From there I may finally jump the pond and do Hammer Horror.The final art will be printed six cards on 12x12 chipboard via silkscreen printmaking. Then I’ll cut the cards to separate them. Previous runs I’ve done them individually and damn thats a nauseating pain in the butt. This will be much faster knocking out six cards at a time.

Three down, three left for the next series. Check my feed to see what else I have! Always loved Invisible Man, most people forget him. Maybe because he’s invisible. This art isn’t quite done, thinking of doing maybe an old castle stone window in the background. I really want to work this series. The last four I did were awfully plain.

What’s next? Frankenstein for sure. The Creature from the Black Lagoon, aka Gillman, Imhotep the Mummy, maybe Phantom of the Opera. From there I may have to do the more obscure or later era monsters like The Amazing Colossal Man, the 50 Foot Woman, and The Metaluna Mutant (This Island Earth). From there I may finally jump the pond and do Hammer Horror.

The final art will be printed six cards on 12x12 chipboard via silkscreen printmaking. Then I’ll cut the cards to separate them. Previous runs I’ve done them individually and damn thats a nauseating pain in the butt. This will be much faster knocking out six cards at a time.

(Source: facebook.com)

I have seen a “Creative People” list floating around Facebook, Instagram and everywhere else. I have disagreed with it since I first laid eyes on it, partricularly with number 1. Originally it had said Creatives are bored. Sorry, but I’m too damn busy with one hundred projects to be bored. I have books, herb gardens, paintings half finished, things to research and learn, and people to talk with. I am never bored.

I decided to revise it almost entirely, but riffing off each key point. What do you think? Do you agree with my list?

(Source: facebook.com)